Although there are about forty recognized species of conure, not all are known in aviculture. This especially applies to the Pyrrhura species, which are so little known that they may even need to be reclassified. The classificatory system provides a universal means of identifying any particular animal or plant. It operates through a series of ranks, which become progressively more specific. Birds form the class Aves, which is composed of various orders. All parrots, including conures, are classified in the order Psittaciformes, and the family Psittacidae. This in turn is divided into subfamilies, with conures featuring in the subfamily Psittacinae.

Beneath the subfamily are the genera, with each genus containing one or more species. These in turn may be split into subspecies, in which case, it can be inferred that the subspecies are very similar in appearance. This is the most detailed level within the classificatory system, which operates on an internationally recognized basis of scientific names throughout, and are often but not always derived from Latin roots. The following example traces the Patagonian Conure through the "trinomial system of nomenclature," as it is sometimes called:

Class: Aves;
Order: Psittaciformes;
Family: Psittacidae;
Subfamily: Psittacinae;
Genus: Cyanoliseus;
Species: Cyanoliseus patagonus;
Subspecies: Cyanoliseus patagonus patagonus, Cyanoliseus patagonus andinus, Cyanoliseus patagonus byroni.

Revisions to classification, notably in the case of species and subspecies, are made as new information comes to light about the birds in question.

Genus ARATINGA
The Aratinga conures are quite variable in terms of their size and coloration. Some are bigger than certain of the smaller macaws, which they resemble to some extent, although they lack the large unfeathered area extending from around the eyes to the beak. Instead, these conures have a clearly defined area of skin which encircles the eyes (orbital ring). In most species, the predominant color is green, typically offset against red or blue markings, although in a few instances, yellow is the main color. By nature, the Aratinga species tend to be quite noisy, yet can become very tame.

Green Conure, Aratinga holochlora
Range: Found over much of Central America, from Mexico southwards to northern Nicaragua. Distinguishing features: Green plumage, with some isolated red feathers close to the head. Orbital ring grayish beige. Irises orangish. Bill horn colored. Young birds: Distinguishable by their darker, brown irises. Length: Variable, in the range 28 cm (11 in) to 35 cm (14 in).

It can be difficult to distinguish among the group of predominantly green conures, which show a variable degree of red markings over their plumage. The situation is made more complex in this instance by the existence of five subspecies. These particular conures tend to be easy to separate, at least from other species, by the color of the skin surrounding their eyes. The most distinctive subspecies is known as the Red´┐Ż­ throated Conure (A h. rubritorquis), which has a broader, more consistent band of red plumage on the throat. It occurs at the southern end of the species' overall range, and is quite rare in avicultural collections. The species itself is not especially popular, by virtue of its dull coloration.

Similarly, Finsch's Conure (A. finschi), whose distribution overlaps with that of the red-throated subspecies, is equally scarce in collections but apparently common in the wild. The distinguishing feature in this instance is an area of red plumage on the forehead, extending above the eye, and another area running down only the bend of the wings.

Red-fronted Conure, Aratinga wagleri
Range: Northern and western South America, from Venezuela to Peru. Distinguishing features: A solid area of red plumage extending back to the hind crown from the base of the eye. There may also be some scattered red feathers on the throat. Young birds: Show greatly reduced areas of red plumage. Length: 35 cm (14 in).

One of the larger of the Aratinga conures, with four subspecies being recognized, the Red-fronted or Wagler's Conure, makes an impressive aviary occupant. The most distinctive of the subspecies are from the southern part of this conure's range. Both A. w. frontata and A. w. minor have red plumage visible on the edge of the wing and at the top of the thigh. Unfortunately, these conures can prove both noisy and destructive, but young birds are likely to become very tame, and invariably develop into devoted companions.

 

Conure Photos
Blackcapped conures
Blackcapped conures
Cinnamon Conure
Cinnamon Conure
Coco Pearly Conure Parrot
Coco Pearly Conure Parrot
Conure Parrot
Conure Parrot
Golden Conure
Golden Conure
GOLDEN CONURES
GOLDEN CONURES
Half Moon Conure
Half Moon Conure
Jandaya Conure
Jandaya Conure
Peach Conure
Peach Conure
Puffy Yellow Sun Conure
Puffy Yellow Sun Conure
Sun Conure Aratinga solstitialis
Sun Conure Aratinga solstitialis
Sun Conure
Sun Conure
Sun Conures grooming
Sun Conures grooming
Young Blue Crown Conure
Young Blue Crown Conure